Join the LGBT Giving Network along with our partners in the LGBTQ & ASO Non-Profit sector for the 5th LGBT+ Philanthropy Summit scheduled for April 2018. The summit is a networking and education event aimed at exploring the role of non-profit leaders in building a culture of philanthropy within their organizations. The conference is geared towards Executive Directors, staff specializing in fundraising/development, programming and communication, board members, professionals involved with corporate giving & foundations and those who believe in building strong organizations that serve the LGBT community.



 

Summit Subsidy Program – Sponsored by TD Bank

Summit organizers are committed to bring guests to a professional event at an affordable price. However, we recognize that access to the Summit can be limited by financial constraint, which is why TD Bank has sponsored the Summit Subsidy Program to help offset the costs of attending the Summit up to $500 and complementary Summit registration. We thank TD Bank for their support.


Wednesday April 11

5:30 PM

Doors Open & Registration

Lobby

7:00 PM

Opening Remarks from LGBT Giving Network and TD Bank

Room 200 (Ballroom)

7:15 PM

Keynote Address by Phillip Ing

7:30 PM

Networking & Reception

8:30 PM

Event Closes

Thursday April 12

8:30 – 9:00 AM

Registration & Breakfast

Lobby & Room 200 (Ballroom)

9:00 – 10:00 AM

Opening Plenary

Success and Survival: Research on the Canadian LGBT+ Non-Profit Sector
Presented By: Jessica Ng

Room 200 (Ballroom)

10:00 – 11:30 AM

Concurrent Workshops – Round 1

Queering the Story: Modernizing LGBT+ Marketing and Communications
ModerPresented By: Mark Aikman, Evalyn Parry & Andria Wilson

Room 200 (Ballroom)

The Development Leader’s Role in Organizational Growth
Presented By: Susan Mullin

Room 100

Moving from Surviving to Thriving in a Small Shop
Presented By: Kimberley MacKenzie

Room 301

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM

Lunch and Learn:

The Secrets of Allyship
Presented By: Biko Beauttah, Humberto Carolo, Beth Jordan &
Doe O’Brien-Teengs
Sponsored by: Community One Foundation

Room 200 (Ballroom)

1:00 – 2:30 PM

Concurrent Workshops – Round 2

Building Your Annual Fundraising Plan
Presented By: Zak Bailey

Room 100

The Corporate and Foundation Landscape
Presented By: Steve Khan, Daniel Rozak, Robert Windrum, Daniel Rozak

Room 200 (Ballroom)

Everything You Need to Know About Fundraising: Executive Director Edition!
Presented By: Emma Lewzey

Room 301

2:30 – 2:45 PM

Break

2:45 – 4:00 PM

Concurrent Workshops – Round 3

Stop Calling It Planned Giving – Start Doing It
Presented By: Cathy Mann

Room 100

In the Red: The Future of Funding for HIV Issues in Canada
Moderated by: Laurie Edmiston
Panelists: Michael Blair, Matthew Halse, Keith Hambly & Philip Wong

Room 301

Creating Internal Allies:  Partnering with Program and Communication Staff in Philanthropy
Presented By: David Brownstone; Carey Suleiman & Denny Young

Room 200 (Ballroom)

4:00 – 4:15 PM

Break

4:15 – 5:00 PM

Closing Plenary

In Conversation with Canada’s LGBTQ2 Secretariat
Moderator: Doug Kerr
Panelists: Randy Boissonnault & Samantha McDonald

Room 200 (Ballroom)

5:30 – 8:00 PM

After-Summit Social
Continue the conversation at our post-summit social!

Churchmouse & Firkin

Thursday April 12
Board Training Session

5:00 PM

Registration Begins

Lobby

5:30 PM

Opening Remarks from LGBT Giving Network & Session Sponsors:
Deloitte and Legacy Private Trust
Dinner Served

Room 200 (Ballroom)

5:45 PM

Board Role in Philanthropy – Learn to Love Fundraising
Presented By: Cathy Mann
Sponsored by Deloitte and Legacy Private Trust

Room 200 (Ballroom)

7:30 PM

Event Closes

Keynote Address – Phillip Ing
Date: April 11, 2018
Time: 7:15 – 7:30 pm

Phillip Ing, volunteer and pioneer behind Fashion Cares. A benefit for the AIDS Committee of Toronto (ACT) and a direct response to the AIDS crisis, Phillip was instrumental in bringing Fashion Cares to life, helping raise $12 million. In the process, Fashion Cares brought its namesake industry and the gay community together in support of AIDS, giving this important health issue a much needed face and voice.


Success and Survival: Research on the Canadian LGBT+ Non-Profit Sector
Date: April 12, 2018
Time: 9:00 – 10:00 am

What does it mean to be an LGBT+ nonprofit organization in Canada today when the social context of what LGBT+ organizations do has changed rapidly in the last decade? What are the organizational challenges (and opportunities) that arise from being an LGBT+ organization in the current social, political, and economic climate? For instance, controlling the perception of the organization is important for any nonprofit, but fine-tuning how the organization is perceived might be made more difficult from some base factors: Canada’s diversity and geographic size, and translating LGBT+ conversations into organizational practice. This session presents preliminary findings from doctoral research interviews conducted with LGBT+ nonprofit organizations in Toronto, Montreal, and Calgary. Drawing upon these preliminary findings, it will also engage with the broader debate on the unintended effects of LGBT+ progressive social policy for nonprofit organizations: Where might LGBT+ organizations ‘lose out’ when they get what they want?

Presented By: Jessica Ng

Jessica Ng is a doctoral candidate in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) in the UK. She studies the unintended effect of progressive social policy on organizations and how organizations navigate survival after attaining success. Her doctoral research explores these larger questions through a case study of LGBTQ organizations in Toronto, Montreal, and Calgary in the post-same-sex marriage period. Jessica’s other research looks at the transformation of the HIV/AIDS service provider sector in Toronto (in progress), and the effect of Christian international NGOs on domestic LGBTQ activism under the authoritarian state in China. She is currently coauthoring research on public support for publicly-funded HIV PrEP in the United Kingdom. A Toronto native, Jessica holds an MPhil in Social Policy and an MSc in Social Policy and Development from the LSE, and a BA in Canadian Studies and Sexual Diversity Studies from the University of Toronto.


Queering the Story: Modernizing LGBT+ Marketing and Communications
Date: April 12, 2018
Time: 10:00 – 11:30 AM

How do some of our most creative non-profits tell stories to engage and build audiences? What are the tools that artists and arts producers use to tell their stories, that all non-profits should know.

Hear from the presenters on how they manage the complexities of storytelling and marketing in an ever evolving community and explore how these cultural organizations define audience segments, manage messaging and utilize technology to reach the public and increase support from donors and funders.

Moderated by: Philip Wong
Panelists: Mark Aikman, Evalyn Parry & Andria Wilson

With more than 15 years’ experience working in LGBTQ issues, Philip Wong is currently Director of Development at the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network. Prior to joining the Legal Network, Philip was Director of Development at Inside Out, presenter of the Ottawa and Toronto LGBT Film Festivals, and Director of Communications at Pride Foundation in Seattle, Washington. Early in his career, he held executive leadership positions at the LGBT Youth Line and the Community One Foundation. His focus on capacity building in the philanthropic sector extends into his current volunteer roles as co-chair of the LGBT Giving Network’s Advisory Board and Summit organizing committee. Philip holds a Bachelor of Journalism from Ryerson University.

Mark Aikman is a consultant, producer, and arts manager who has been working in Toronto’s theatre scene since 2007. He is currently the Artistic Producer at Birdtown and Swanville and the Director of Development and Communications at Buddies in Bad Times Theatre, where he also sits on the steering committee for the ARTATTACK! live art auction. He also sits on the board of Bluemouth Inc. and has worked in marketing and fundraising at a number of companies including Crow’s Theatre, SummerWorks Performance Festival, and The Dietrich Group. Among the things he’s been least qualified for, but still rocked, include producing a drag queen beauty pageant, being a web designer, and gluten-free baking.

Evalyn Parry is the Artistic Director of Buddies in Bad Times Theatre.  An interdisciplinary director, writer, performer and musician, her award-winning, innovative work is inspired by intersections of social justice, history and auto/biography.  Notable recent works at Buddies include writing and performing in Kiinalik: These Sharp Tools; Gertrude and Alice; directing The Youth / Elder Project, the Dora-Award winning Obaaberima, and touring extensively around the continent with her show SPIN.  


Andria Wilson is the Executive Director of Inside Out, Canada’s largest LGBT Film Festival. A recent full-time resident of Toronto, she was an integral contributor to the arts and LGBTQ communities in Atlantic Canada for the last 15 years, holding key leadership roles at the Atlantic Film Festival, East Coast Music Association, TD Halifax Jazz Festival, Creative Nova Scotia Awards, and with renowned international touring company 2b theatre. In 2011 she co-founded OUTeast, Atlantic Canada’s Queer Film Festival, and remains a key advisor of the festival.


The Development Leader’s Role in Organizational Growth
Date: April 12, 2018
Time: 10:00 – 11:30 AM

Fundraising is a team sport. This means whether you are the only development professional in your organization, or perhaps one of a small team, you need to be able to engage with and influence colleagues and volunteers who at best don’t report to you, or who at worst think of fundraising in less than positive ways. This session will explore tools and techniques to help you manage up, across and around your organization to help build a culture that supports philanthropy and ultimately benefits the cause you serve.

Presented By: Susan Mullin, CFRE

Susan Mullin has several (enough said!) decades of professional fundraising experience to share. She’s worked on development teams that ranged in size from one to 45. She understands the importance of creating a culture that supports development. Currently CEO of Southlake Regional Health Centre Foundation, Susan has also held leadership roles with Casey House Foundation, CAMH Foundation and York University Foundation to name a few. She was board chair of the Greater Toronto Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals and was actively involved for close to a decade in the LGBT community as a board member for Community One Foundation.


Moving from Surviving to Thriving in a Small Shop
Date: April 12, 2018
Time: 10:00 – 11:30 AM

This session will tackle the biggest challenges of working in a small, under resourced organization. Kimberley will offer tools to help overcome things like, under-performing staff, a perceived lack of resources and unrealistic expectations, whether they are too high OR too low. It all starts with shifting your mindset and that of others around you. Together you can create a world in which you and your team are transformed from just surviving to thriving.

Participants will:

  • Learn how to have productive, inspiring and collaborative relationships and conversations with their senior volunteers and Board of Directors
  • Be inspired to think bigger and motivate your team and organization to dream about stretching toward possibilities, while exploring your own assumptions and limiting beliefs blocking you from achieving greater success
  • Advance a philanthropic culture so that your whole team sees the fun in fundraising
  • Implement self-care practices so that you can lead your team to success

Presented by Kimberley MacKenzie

Kimberley MacKenzie is passionate about philanthropy and creating transformative change. For over 18 years, she’s been delivering double-digit revenue growth and advancing a culture of philanthropy to increase their impact her clients have in their communities. Kimberley is currently working with the AIDS Committee of Toronto to help build their major and legacy giving programs and advance a culture of philanthropy. An active volunteer and Certified Fund Raising Executive, Kimberley was a member of the Rogare International Advisory Panel, was the inaugural volunteer fundraiser in the early days of the SOFII Foundation and is the past editor of Hilborn: Charity eNEWS. You can reach Kimberley by email at k@kimberleymackenzie.ca.


The Secrets of Allyship
Sponsored by Community One Foundation

Date: April 12, 2017
Time: 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM

What does it mean to be a great ally? In a community made up of so many communities, how can non-profit leaders ensure they are paving a path for access and equity —and avoid being a roadblock. Join non-profit leaders as they share their experiences and lessons about allyship.

Presented By: Biko Beauttah, Humberto Carolo, Beth Jordan & Doe O’Brien-Teengs 

Biko Beauttah is a board member at The 519 and a human rights activist currently attending George Brown College majoring in Jewellery Arts. Born and raised in Kenya, Biko moved to Canada in 2006 to seek asylum because being considered LGBTQ* is considered a crime in her home country. A champion of refugee and sexual minority rights, she has spread her message of tolerance and equality through various platforms such as the Canadian Council for Refugees and the Refugee Pride Convention, where she was a discussant on panels. Biko was also the first person to give a lecture on gender studies upon the inception of such a course at a high school in Canada. At George Brown, Biko also served as the Women and Trans Persons representative, bridging the gap between her constituents, the college administration and the Student Association. Through the Student Union, Biko was also part of a panel which included the founders of Black Lives Matter US, to discuss issues faced by racialized students, and sexual minorities on college campuses at The Canadian Federation of Students Convention. She was also the first queer person of African descent to open the Toronto Stock Exchange. Biko has worked on Trans Workforce, the world’s first job fair geared towards people who identify as Trans and Gender Nonconforming – an initiative she is determined to launch so as to get transgender people out of underground economies like sex-work. Like most trans women of colour, due to society’s stigma, even she, with all her brilliance, cannot find a job.

In addition to being featured on The Tyra Banks show, Biko Beauttah has also worked as an Image Consultant, Art Director and Wardrobe Stylist.

Humberto Carolo is the Executive Director of White Ribbon. He is a gender-based violence prevention specialist with over 17 years’ experience in the not-for-profit sector with expertise in gender equality, human rights, HIV/AIDS, LGBTQ advocacy, community development and multi-sectoral partnerships. His current work is focused on developing educational strategies to engage men and boys in promoting gender equality, healthy masculinities, and preventing violence against women. In addition to his work in Canada and the United States, Humberto has developed significant cross-cultural experience in diverse settings, including Brazil; Cape Verde; Sri Lanka; Kenya; Papua New Guinea; Vietnam; and Zambia. Humberto sits on the Board of Directors of the Global MenEngage Alliance and co-chairs the sub-regional North America MenEngage Network. He is the Chair of the Board of Directors of Abrigo Centre, a community-based organization serving the Portuguese-speaking communities in Toronto. Humberto serves on the Ontario Government Provincial Roundtable on Violence Against Women.

Beth Jordan is the Founder and Principal of Adobe Consulting Services, a boutique consulting firm providing facilitation, training, planning and evaluation services to government and the not for profit sector. She has worked extensively on issues pertaining to HIV/AIDS, violence against women, community-based health and the integration of anti-racism anti-oppression frameworks.

With over 18 years of leadership experience, Beth is a sought-after facilitator and speaker, who is recognized for her ability to effectively lead organizations and large groups to an understanding and achievement of their common goals. She is a strategic thinker and skilled organizational developer who has collaborated and consulted with local, provincial, national and international non-governmental organizations (NGO’s) on a range of organizational development issues. A former director of a not for profit, she led her organization to secure $4.5 million in funding and expand from a local Toronto service to one that served the entire province of Ontario. Recently, she wrote the successful business case to secure $8.84 million in funding for her clients to build a state of the art emergency shelter for women facing intimate partner violence.

Beth Jordan is a recipient of the 2005 YWCA Women of Distinction Award for Social Justice and the 2006 Premiers Award.

Doe O’Brien-Teengs is a member of the Winisk First Nation. Her mother is Cree and her father was Irish Canadian heritage. She is an emerging Cree scholar, storyteller/writer, community based researcher, two-spirit wife and mother. Doe worked as an outreach worker for Two-Spirited People of the 1st Nations for seven years; as a regional outreach worker for the Ontario Aboriginal HIV/AIDS Strategy (Oahas) for eleven years; and as the Executive Director of Oahas for three years. During those years, Doe engaged with frontline work with clients, and HIV prevention work among Indigenous populations in Ontario, as well as cross-cultural competency work with ally agencies. Doe has published articles and chapters on two-spirit identity, health, and mental health issues. Doe continues to be engaged in community-based research projects and is currently working on a toolkit with Dr. Saara Greene and team members from across the country in order to improve services and support for Indigenous women who are living with HIV through fertility, pregnancy, birth and motherhood experiences. Doe is currently a PhD Candidate in Education at Lakehead University in the Joint PhD Program. In the meantime, she is an Indigenous Knowledge Resource Teacher at the Royal Ontario Museum and a Sessional Lecturer at Lakehead University in Orillia teaching Social Difference in Education (an introduction into key concepts in social justice education).


Building Your Annual Fundraising Plan
Date: April 12, 2018
Time: 1:00 – 2:30 PM

Your annual plan is your roadmap to success and this session will help you build such a plan. Starting with a bit of fundraising theory, you will then review the interplay of goals, strategies and tactics that will support you to develop the components of an annual fundraising plan. You’ll leave this session with an outline of an annual plan for your organization, along with some bonus content and worksheets that will help you focus your fundraising (and your thoughts) to make an in the near-term.

Presented By: Zak Bailey, CFRE

Zak Bailey is an independent fundraising consultant who helps charitable organizations with their fundraising activities. Many of Canada’s largest and most prominent charities have relied on his talent and fundraising expertise to develop and write their Case for Support and Case Statements, create and implement fundraising programs, plans and strategies, craft funding proposals, create policies, and manage fundraising projects and development operations.

Zak’s fundraising career spans more than 25 years and he’s held senior fundraising roles at the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, Alzheimer Society of Canada, The Arthritis Society of Canada, Canadian Centre for Philanthropy (now Imagine Canada), Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation, and the Ontario Liberal Party.

Zak is active in the fundraising profession, volunteering and sharing his expertise at local, national and international fundraising conferences as a presenter and speaker. He gives back to the community as a senior level volunteer and donor to a variety of personal charities.


The Corporate & Foundation Landscape
Date: April 12, 2018
Time: 1:00 – 2:30 PM

As fundraisers, we spend significant time and energy to gain support from Foundation funding sources to help keep the core of charitable operations running. At the same time, we make our best efforts to engage with corporations who share our values and may want to engage meaningful partnerships to advance the mission and vision of our charity.

This engaging panel discussion will offer insights from individuals who work to engage in support of charities on how to put together a solid proposal, and how best to engage in meaningful corporate and foundation relationships that supports the mission of the charity, as well as the philanthropic objectives of generous corporate donors.

Presented By: Steve Khan, Daniel Rozak & Robert Windrum

Steve Khan joined the Ontario Trillium Foundation as a Program Manager in May 2017. He delivers in person and online information sessions. He also provides one-on-one telephone coaching calls for declined applicants to learn more about how they can improve future applications and enjoys answering questions from current applicants.

Steve worked in the arts and culture sector for 10 years at a variety of organizations, such as: Canadian Heritage, The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, Luminato Festival and Gallery TPW, among many others. He has an honorary Bachelor of Arts degree in History from the University of Toronto and is a graduate from the joint Art and Art History program at the University of Toronto Mississauga and Sheridan College with a Minor in Women and Gender Studies.

As a Positive Space Champion, Steve coordinated several Positive Space Lunch and Learns in the federal public service, most recently, to celebrate the International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia with 203 participants in 18 federal departments. He is the new Events and Special Project Co-Lead for the Ontario Public Service Pride Network.

Robert Windrum has over 25 years of experience in non-profit management and fundraising in the arts, education or community-based organizations. He has also worked in leadership giving and major gifts at the Toronto General & Western Hospital Foundation. He is currently the Executive Director of Project Sunshine Canada, a registered charity engaging pediatric patients and their families in healthcare facilities across Canada.

As the General Manager of the Canadian Lesbian & Gay Archives, he lead the fundraising and development for the transition to their permanent home at 34 Isabella. Currently, Robert sits on the boards of the Textile Museum of Canada as well as Wellesley Central Residences, Inc. lending his fundraising expertise to advance each organizations’ vision.

Daniel Rozak is the Senior Manager of Community Relations at TD Bank Group. His team focuses on LGBT, Arts and Culture, Theatres, Visible Minority, Music Festivals, Pride Celebrations, Ethno-cultural festivals, People with Disability and Women in Leadership programs to bring TD’s Ready Commitment to life. As part of his role, Daniel manages a team of professionals to ensure the Bank is reaching its mandate by creating access and enhancing the lives of individuals within our communities where we live work and play. Prior to this, Daniel was the Manager of Community Events focused on how TD engages with its internal partners and consumers.

Daniel is a strong advocate of inclusion and equality and leads the LGBT, Visible Minority and Peoples with Disabilities charge in community relations. He sits on various internal committees ensuring that the community giving mandate is a focus enterprise wide and integrated into everything we do at TD.


Everything You Need to Know About Fundraising: Executive Director Edition!
Date: April 12, 2018
Time: 1:00 – 2:30 PM

As an Executive Director, you wear countless hats. You’re stretched thin managing and troubleshooting programs, operations, human resources, finances…the list can feel endless! In the midst of the day to day chaos, how can you make sure you’re investing your limited time wisely to ensure you have the resources you need to sustain and grow the important work of your organization?

Join us for this practical session and discover what you can do as an ED or senior leader to minimize your fundraising pain, and maximize your fundraising gain. Emma will draw on her 20+ years of fundraising and senior leadership experience to share her top tips, strategies and ideas, including:

  • Focusing your resources on the fundraising that gets you the best results, and aligns with the values of your organization
  • Working effectively on fundraising with your board and staff
  • Overcoming the fears that can hold us back from raising more money for our important work

Presented By: Emma Lewzey

Emma Lewzey is the Founder and Principal Consultant of Blue Sky Philanthropy, and is an award-winning fundraiser with more than 20 years of experience helping build and grow successful, sustainable fundraising programs. Emma is dedicated to working for change in our sector, and currently serves as the National Chair of the Association of Fundraising Professionals’ Fellowship in Inclusion and Philanthropy, a unique program that works to build a pipeline of fundraising leaders who reflect the diversity of our communities.


Stop Calling It Planned Giving – Start Doing It
Date: April 12, 2018
Time: 2:45 – 4:00 PM

Too busy to get to planned giving? Aren’t sure how to actually do it in between special events, direct mail, newsletters, meetings and grants? First: STOP CALLING IT PLANNED GIVING! But start doing it. Having worked in one-Mann shops and as a planned giving specialist in a large organization, Cathy offers pragmatic tips, a check-list and suggestions about how to engage support of the board and donors to help you make sure planned giving gets buy-in across the organization. You will leave with the tools needed to get your planned giving program off the ground. And we’ll discuss whether there are differences in developing a planned giving program in the LGBTQ community.

Presented By: Cathy Mann, CFRE

Cathy Mann has spent three decades working in the charitable sector: since 1994 as a philanthropy professional and before that as Executive Director of child-serving agencies. During Cathy’s tenure as Executive Director, Frontier College Foundation won the “Excellence In Fundraising for Small Shops Award,” from the International Association of Fundraising Professionals, representing 30,000+ fundraisers from 7 countries. Since 2007, as part of Cathy Mann & Associates, Cathy has advised multi-level and community-based organizations working in social justice, with youth, in education, with indigenous communities and in healthcare. In 2015, Cathy was recognized by Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota for excellence in scholarship for her final graduate project on the role of philanthropy in collective impact. She is the Academic Coordinator of and instructor in Ryerson University’s Fundraising Management Certificate program and is a frequent speaker and writer. Occasionally, she plays her ukulele in public.


In the Red: The Future of Funding for HIV issues in Canada
Date: April 12, 2018
Time: 2:45 – 4:00 PM

As treatment for HIV improves and life expectancies increase, there is a growing perception that AIDS in Canada is no longer the public health threat it once posed. But longer lives also mean that more people are living with HIV in Canada than ever before, and this number is only expected to increase. How can HIV organizations meet the increased demand for their services with fewer resources? Panelists weigh in and share strategies from their own experience.

Moderator: Laurie Edmiston
Panelists: Michael Blair, Matthew Halse, Keith Hambly & Philip Wong

Laurie Edmiston is the executive director of CATIE, Canada’s source for HIV and hepatitis C information. Over the past 30 years since Laurie began working in the HIV/AIDS sector, she has developed HIV prevention and support programs geared to diverse populations including street youth, sex workers and people who use drugs.

 

Michael Blair has been with Fife House since March 2011. Fife House Foundation is the largest provider of supportive housing for people living with HIV/AIDS in Canada. Michael started at Fife House as the Director of Community Programs, was the Director of Residential Programs, and Director of Operations and Community Partnerships. Michael has played a key role in the development of community partnerships and new programs at Fife House. Central to this work has been his leadership in the development of the new Huntley Transitional Housing Program, the Coordinated Access Initiative, the Complex Care Program, and expanding Fife House’s housing and referral partnerships.

Matthew Halse is Manager of Community Relations and Communications at ViiV Healthcare, a company dedicated 100% to HIV. Matthew’s role at ViiV is to engage community leaders and AIDS Service Organizations to fund, foster and build HIV prevention and support programs across Canada. He’s previously served as Executive Director of AIDS Community Care Montreal and Instructor in the Department of Women’s Studies and Feminist Research at Western University.

Keith Hambly is very excited to be back working with a dynamic organization such as Fred Victor, one of the largest not-for profit, multi service organizations in Toronto. Fred Victor has been helping homeless women, men and families and those living on low incomes in the city for nearly 125 years also advocates for effective public policy. As vice president, programs and services, Keith oversees an array of programs addressing housing and housing access, health, case management and community supports, and employment training. Prior to returning to Fred Victor, Keith held the role of executive director of Fife House, the leading housing and support services agency in Toronto serving HIV-positive women, men and families. Keith is currently a board member of the Ontario HIV Treatment Network and member of the Toronto Central LHIN Mid East Health Link.

With more than 15 years’ experience working in LGBTQ issues, Philip Wong is currently Director of Development at the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network. Prior to joining the Legal Network, Philip was Director of Development at Inside Out, presenter of the Ottawa and Toronto LGBT Film Festivals, and Director of Communications at Pride Foundation in Seattle, Washington. Early in his career, he held executive leadership positions at the LGBT Youth Line and the Community One Foundation. His focus on capacity building in the philanthropic sector extends into his current volunteer roles as co-chair of the LGBT Giving Network’s Advisory Board and Summit organizing committee. Philip holds a Bachelor of Journalism from Ryerson University.


Creating Internal Allies: Partnering with Program and Communication Staff in Philanthropy
Date: April 12, 2018
Time: 2:45 – 4:00 PM

Donors that personally witness your organization’s mission, and that meet those it serves, become more committed. But fundraisers usually need the cooperation of front-line staff to make this possible. When the public understands your organization’s objectives, it’s easier to recruit volunteers and cultivate prospective donors. But fundraisers usually need the cooperation of communications staff to reach the public. In this open and honest discussion among a social worker, a marketer, and a fundraiser, we’ll explore why these internal relationships are challenging and what we can do to tear down the walls and become allies.

Presented By: David Brownstone; Carey Suleiman; Denny Young
David Brownstone (MSW, RSW) is the Professional Practice Lead for Social Work at the Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto. Along with his clinical and education work, David manages the Patient Amenities Fund which is a donor funded program to provide financial assistance for unexpected and/or immediate needs related to their child’s medical care. This work involves a close relationship with service providers as well as SickKids Foundation partners. Along with his 18 years at SickKids, David was also a board member of the Lesbian and Gay Community Appeal, now known as Community One Foundation, specifically involved in the yearly granting program.

A life-long champion of the charitable sector, Carey Suleiman has worked her entire career in not-for-profits. Carey got her start as an intern at National Public Radio and never looked back. Positions have included senior leadership roles with Ravinia Festival (Chicago), Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Philadelphia Orchestra, and Toronto Symphony. Over the years, Carey has lead strategic communications, media relations, sales and customer service teams. Her revenue management strategies and audience development programs continue to drive revenue and attendance for orchestras across the US. Carey is currently the Director of Community Giving and Marketing at the World Wildlife Fund Canada.

Denny Young is a Professor at Humber College in Toronto, and Coordinator of its prestigious Fundraising Management program. A passionate advocate for the nonprofit sector, Denny has shown exemplary leadership as a fundraising professional and through teaching, writing, and coaching. In recognition of his dedication, he was honoured in 2014 as Outstanding Fundraising Professional by the Greater Toronto Chapter of the AFP. Denny has a Masters degree in Philanthropy and Development from Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota, has completed the Ivey School of Business Executive Program, and has a certificate in the Foundations of Coaching from the Adler Graduate Professional School.


Closing Plenary – In Conversation with Canada’s LGBTQ2 Secretariat
Date: April 12, 2018
Time: 4:00 – 5:00 PM

LGBT Giving Network Advisory Board member Doug Kerr will lead a conversation with Samantha McDonald, Executive Director of the federal LGBTQ2 Secretariat.
The discussion will cover some closing reflections on the day as well as discuss the role of this new federal body in supporting charities and nonprofits working with LGBTQ2 communities in Canada. The conversation will examine ways that the federal government is looking to support LGBTQ2 communities and ways that civil society organizations can engage with the government.

Moderator: Doug Kerr
Panelists: Randy Boissonnault & Samantha McDonald

Doug Kerr is an organizational development consultant and college professor. Originally from Edmonton, Alberta, he has made Toronto his home since 1996. Doug has degrees from the University of Alberta and the University of Toronto. He was Chair of the Board of Directors of Community One Foundation for three years and is one of the founders of the LGBT Giving Network. He spent six years on the Board of Directors of Sherbourne Health Centre, was Chair of the Human Rights Program for Pride Toronto and Co-Chaired the WorldPride 2014 Human Rights Conference.

In addition to running his own consulting practice, Doug has taught classes both at the University of Toronto’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work and at Centennial College. Doug is on the National Steering Committee for the Dignity Network, a network of over 20 organizations across Canada involved in international LGBTI issues, and is a Vice-President with Fierté Canada Pride, Canada’s national association of Pride organizers. He is also currently a civil society representative on the Executive Committee of the Equal Rights Coalition, the world’s first intergovernmental body interested in advancing human rights for LGBTI people.

Randy Boissonnault is the Member of Parliament for Edmonton Centre and the Special Advisor to the Prime Minister on LGBTQ2 Issues. Prior to his election, Randy was a successful entrepreneur, community leader, and philanthropist. He has a strong record of leadership in business, in public service, and in the not-for-profit sector.

Randy discovered his passion for leadership and public service at the University of Alberta, where he served as President of the Students’ Union. Since studying at the University of Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar, Randy has worked as a lecturer at the University of Alberta’s Campus Saint-Jean, and as a journalist and political commentator for CBC Radio-Canada and Les Affaires. Randy also owned and led a consulting business that helped small- and medium-sized businesses overcome their strategy and management challenges.

A proud Rotarian, Randy has a long history of charitable work, both locally in Edmonton and abroad. He founded Literacy Without Borders, an international NGO devoted to promoting literacy for both children and adults in the developing world and in Canada. He has also served as Vice Chair of TEDx Edmonton and Chair of the Board of Directors of the Francophone Economic Council of Alberta, the Francophone Sport Federation of Alberta, and the Canadian Francophone Games. He was one of the 50 founders of Startup Edmonton and was a finisher of the Ironman Canada Triathlon.

Samantha McDonald is the Executive Director of the LGBTQ2 Secretariat, Privy Council Office, Government of Canada. Samantha is proud of the accomplishments achieved to date in this role including the LGBTQ2 Apology and significant changes to unjust legislation. Samantha has been applying her innovative and resourceful policy skills within the not-for-profit, provincial and federal governments for 20 years including work on seniors policy, health promotion and immigration.


Board Role in Philanthropy | Learn to Love Fundraising (Or at Least Not Hate or Fear it) in 120 minutes
Sponsored by Deloitte and Legacy Private Trust

Date: April 12, 2018
Time: 5:30 – 7:30 PM
Location: The 519, Ballroom

You’re a board member. You’re passionate about the cause you’re supporting. So passionate, you’re volunteering what little free time you have.

You know something about fundraising – you’ve participated in United Way campaigns, your alumni group, or you’ve been involved in fundraising events. But times are changing and your organization needs to raise more money than ever before. And you’re not quite sure what your role can or should be to help make that happen.

Together, we will have frank discussions about board members’ roles in fundraising. You will have the opportunity to ask the questions you may feel uncomfortable asking at your board table; we will discuss ways you can be meaningfully involved in fundraising and you’ll be given the opportunity to explore your beliefs and values about money and how they influence your organization’s fundraising. You’ll also leave the session with checklists and materials you can take back to your organization to inspire conversation with your board and senior staff.

Presented By: Cathy Mann, CFRE

Cathy Mann has spent three decades working in the charitable sector: since 1994 as a philanthropy professional and before that as Executive Director of child-serving agencies. During Cathy’s tenure as Executive Director, Frontier College Foundation won the “Excellence In Fundraising for Small Shops Award,” from the International Association of Fundraising Professionals, representing 30,000+ fundraisers from 7 countries. Since 2007, as part of Cathy Mann & Associates, Cathy has advised multi-level and community-based organizations working in social justice, with youth, in education, with indigenous communities and in healthcare. In 2015, Cathy was recognized by Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota for excellence in scholarship for her final graduate project on the role of philanthropy in collective impact. She is the Academic Coordinator of and instructor in Ryerson University’s Fundraising Management Certificate program and is a frequent speaker and writer. Occasionally, she plays her ukulele in public.